Last edited by Yozshurr
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

5 edition of Preventing amphetamine-type stimulant use among young people found in the catalog.

Preventing amphetamine-type stimulant use among young people

a policy and programming guide

  • 126 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by United Nations in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Teenagers -- Substance use -- Prevention,
  • Children -- Substance use -- Prevention,
  • Amphetamine abuse

  • Edition Notes

    StatementUnited Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Vienna
    ContributionsUnited Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 29 p. ;
    Number of Pages29
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16140912M
    ISBN 109211482232
    ISBN 109789211482232
    OCLC/WorldCa179923568

    Neither drug had a pharmacological use until , when Smith, Kline and French began selling amphetamine as an inhaler under the trade name Benzedrine for congestion. [8] During World War II, amphetamine and methamphetamine were used extensively by Allied and Axis forces for their stimulant and performance-enhancing effects.   Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are the second most commonly used illicit drugs in Europe and globally. However, there is limited understanding of what shapes patterns of ATS use over the life course. The ATTUNE project “Understanding.

    Risk of Later Substance Use. Some people may be concerned about later substance misuse in children and teens who've been prescribed stimulant drugs to treat ADHD. Studies so far have not shown a difference in later substance use in young people with ADHD treated with prescription stimulants compared with those who didn't receive such treatment. Cocaine use is infrequently reported among people who inject drugs, with only 13% reporting use at least once in the last 6 months (Peacock et al. b). For participants of the EDRS, cocaine was the third most commonly used stimulant drug (after ecstasy and cannabis) with 67% reporting recent use in , the highest percentage of.

      Drug education programs may reduce the odds for new amphetamine use or a relapse, but study results are mixed. Counseling for emotional and family support can also help. Drug use treatment and HIV prevention, treatment and care should be tailored to the specific needs of women. The World Drug Report provides a global overview of the supply and demand of opiates, cocaine, cannabis, amphetamine-type stimulants and new psychoactive substances (NPS), as well as their impact on health.


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Preventing amphetamine-type stimulant use among young people Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Preventing amphetamine-type stimulant use among young people: a policy and programming guide. [United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.;].

Preventing amphetamine-type stimulant use among young people. New York: United Nations, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, International government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

ISBN. Crime prevention assessment tool: Handbook on planning and action for Crime Prevention in Southern Africa and the Caribbean Regions: Gender in the criminal justice system assessment tool: Preventing amphetamine-type stimulant use among young people: Guide to implementing family skills training programmes for drug abuse prevention.

The goal of this book is to help researchers, practitioners, and policy makers prevent drug abuse, primarily among adolescents who either have not used drugs before or have just started using them.

Handbook of Adolescent Drug Use Prevention: Research, Intervention Strategies, and Pages:   Amphetamine-type stimulant use and HIV/STI risk behaviour among young female sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia Author links open overlay panel L. Maher a 1 P. Phlong b 1 J. Mooney-Somers a 1 S. Keo c 1 E.

Stein d 1 M.C. Couture d 1 K. Page d 1Cited by: Introduction: Amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATS) use is associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviours and is an emergent problem among men who have sex with men (MSM) in.

use among youth and teens ages 12 through 17 and young adults ages 18 through The first four pages are an overview of youth and young adult tobacco use, and the sections that follow provide details on health effects, factors that encourage young people to use tobacco, the role of the tobacco industry, and what we can do to solve the problem.

International Standards for Drug Use Prevention – Second Edition, The first edition was published in and summarized the evidence of drug use prevention at the global level.

The value of the first edition was widely recognized and acknowledged by Member States and other national and international stakeholders. The use of ATS is a global and growing phenomenon and in recent years, there has been a pronounced increase in the production and use of ATS worldwide.

Over the past decade, abuse of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) has infiltrated its way into the mainstream culture in certain countries. Why is adolescence a critical time for preventing drug addiction. As noted previously, early use of drugs increases a person's chances of becoming addicted.

Remember, drugs change the brain—and this can lead to addiction and other serious problems. So, preventing early use of drugs or alcohol may go a long way in reducing these risks. The majority of adults who meet the criteria for having a substance use disorder started using substances during their teen and young adult years.

5 Youth with substance use disorders also experience higher rates of physical and mental illnesses, diminished overall health and well-being, and potential progression to addiction. NIDA's prevention research program focuses on risks for drug use and other problem behaviors that occur throughout a child's development, from pregnancy through young adulthood.

Research funded by NIDA and other federal research organizations - such as the National Institute of Mental Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - shows that early intervention can prevent. The Use of Amphetamine Type Stimulants and the Normalization of Recreational Drug Use among People Who Attend Electronic Music Events Article (PDF Available).

Intravenous drug use was relatively higher among ATS drug users and in particular among ice users. Overseas studies of amphetamine users have found that increases in amphetamine use have led to increased intravenous drug use, particularly among young drug users (KleePeters et al.

McAllister and Makkai ). Amphetamine-type stimulants Background. There has been great concern about the use of amphetamines, MDMA and other psychostimulants as a public health issue.

While amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) have been available and used for many years, in the last decade or so their manufacture, trafficking and use have been increasing in many countries.

Amphetamine-type stimulant use and HIV/STI risk behaviour among young female sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia L Maher, 1 P Phlong, 2 J Mooney-Somers, 1 S Keo, 3 E Stein, 4 K Page, 4 and On behalf of the Young Women’s Health Study Collaborative (John Kaldor, Serey Phal Kien, Lisa Maher, Tooru Nemoto, Kimberly Page, Joel Palefsky.

About College-Age & Young Adults. This section features the most recent Monitoring the Future (MTF) national survey results on substance use in college-age adults ages 19 to 22, including patterns of marijuana and alcohol use, nicotine use, and nonmedical use of prescription drugs.

It also covers newer trends, such as use of e-vaporizers and hookahs. Teen substance use. The teen and young adult years are confusing, complicated and formative. Understanding what's happening socially and developmentally — and how it can intersect with substance use — is fundamental to setting the stage for healthier outcomes.

Z.N. Soe. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Burma (Myanmar)Background: Burma (Myanmar) is included among major centers for manufacture of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS).

In the past 5 years, there has been a significant increase in the number of methamphetamine users among young people, especially by undergraduate students. Drug use can result in drug addiction, serious impairment, illness and death. Health risks of commonly used drugs include the following: Cocaine — Risk of heart attack, stroke and seizures; Ecstasy — Risk of liver failure and heart failure; Inhalants — Risk of damage to heart, lungs, liver and kidneys from long-term use; Marijuana — Risk of impairment in memory, learning.

Participants agreed that young people begin using other drugs before using and injecting opiates. In a number of the consultations, perceived changes in drug trends amongst young people were discussed, generally from heroin to legal highs and synthetic drugs including amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATS).

This trend has been reported elsewhere [1,24].Introduction. The use of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) is recognized as a major global public health World Drug Report showed that the ATS is the second leading substance of abuse following cannabis worldwide, with estimates that up to 52 million individuals (% of the global population aged 15–64 years) have used ATS at least once in the past 12.

Introduction. Methamphetamine and other amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) increase the concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synaptic cleft with associated feelings of increased energy, confidence, and euphoria in the user [].It is estimated that between 14 and 52 million people used ATS in